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Topic-icon Tri-Five Avalon original Glasspar engine brackets

  • Jayarrgh
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3 years 1 month ago #29739 by Jayarrgh
A little paint here and there can make a boat look a lot less like a derelict. I have filled in all the holes in the deck and put on a coat of Interlux primer. I am still working on general area of the bow and dashboard.

-JR (Jerry)
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3 years 1 month ago #29740 by Jayarrgh
I am now certain that my Avalon originally had a green colored gel-coat. I found the green showing through under the white in many places all over the hull and deck. So my boat actually has a white gel-coat on top of a green gel-coat. It is my belief that was done at the factory, before the boat was sent to a dealer. The original color was like this one.



My theory is that Avalon production started in the summer of 1954. At that time, the manufacturing of fiberglass boats in large volume was still an evolving technology. One of the recent process changes was the introduction of a colored gel-coat to the female mold. The Avalon would have had (probably) one of the largest production runs of any Glasspar boat to that date. Once the mass production process bugs were worked out, it would make sense to keep on making all boats the same way. If so, then I think all the initial production run of Avalon boats were molded with the same color, i.e. “green”. No color is mentioned in the early brochures but in the b&w images the boat looks dark enough to be that green.

Other manufacturers in 1955, began selling outboard powered fiberglass runabouts with molded-in gel-coats in multiple colors. Glasspar would have needed to stay competitive. At some point, perhaps for the ’56 model year, I think they did this by a simple method. Without messing with the FG mold process, they re-sprayed some of the green boats with a white (or other color) gel coat. I believe that is what was done with my Avalon. A contrasting trim color (in this case, light blue) was then painted onto the deck.

This is all speculation on my part. I have no actual proof that is how this boat came to have two gel-coats of different colors.
I do know that by 1957, with several factory sites making boats, Glasspar stepped up to the challenge of using varying gel-coat colors in the molding process. The price list for that year mentions five available “impregnated” colors.
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3 years 1 month ago #29741 by 16again
Hey Jerry the boat is coming along nicely. Did it have a lot of crazing in the Gel Coat and if so how did you prep them prior to primer?
Jack

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3 years 1 month ago #29742 by Jayarrgh
Jack, yes, there was a lot of crazing on the deck. Some of it was down into the green gel coat. Also there were some chipped places and some depressed areas where odd miscellaneous fittings had been installed. There are different ways to deal with these and mostly what varies is the amount of effort to sand the surface prior to painting. For fine cracks with no chips or depressions, I just used a high build primer (Interlux Pre-coat). A little sanding and a second coat works well for that. For more serious cracks or chips, I used an epoxy / filler mix spread thin over the cracks and thicker into the chips. Filler material was either silica or wood flour. Silica is harder to sand but is stronger and seems to fill better in small areas. Wood flour was used for holes where a lot of volume was needed (with a backing plate). For depressed areas where the deck had been deformed from old fittings, I used an epoxy / microballoon mix to level it out. That mix is a good non-structural filler over large areas and is easy to sand but it does need a coat of epoxy to seal it after sanding. I usually coat all the epoxy mix repairs with clear epoxy after sanding but only the micro-balloons actually require it.

-JR (Jerry)

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3 years 1 month ago #29743 by 16again
Just curious as my Redfish and the Glass Craft both have significant crazing. On the G3 I ground out each crack, sanded edges and filled with kitty hair then sanded again down to 180 at which time I re-gel coated. For the other two boats I was actually planning on grinding out the cracks, sanding the edges, filling with kitty hair and then laying a fine glass cloth over the whole boat. The same way I would do a clear transom or deck. My thinking is that maybe this would stop the crazing process. Since I'm not ready to start either at this time I will continue to mull it over.
Jack

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3 years 1 month ago #29751 by Jayarrgh
My next big job was to be building seats. However, before I could do that, I needed to have the helm and steering wheel in place to see where the seats should be. The helm then became the next problem to tackle.





The original Attwood helm mounted low on the dash and the wheel had a certain rake built in; also it stuck out from the dash more than 6 inches at the center. I decided to use a Uflex Rotech rotary helm and like the Teleflex version, it needed to mount in the center of the dash. These helms have the wheel fairly close to dash. I built up the instrument / helm panel to get the wheel farther out and used the 20 degree angled helm mount from Uflex. This is the best wheel position I could come up with but it is still in quite a different location than the original Attwood pulley and cable helm.



Obviously, I did more than just make a mock-up of the helm. The instrument / helm panel is pretty much a finished piece. It is temporarily mounted to the dashboard of the boat until I work out the seat / helm relationship.

-JR (Jerry)
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