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Topic-icon From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing

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1 year 8 months ago - 1 year 8 months ago #28931 by gwbell
gwbell replied the topic: From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing
Terry,

A little computer issue with trying to satisfy your request. Alex wrote his report in Word. We don't have the ability to convert Word to a pdf document. At 10-pages this might not be wise to try and copy the report, but I have copied and pasted Alex notes from his phone interview with Bill Tritt. Keep in mind this was written by a High School kid, but this is the interview notes in it's entirety:

Mr. Bill Tritt Interview:

1. When did you first become interested in boats?

When he was 10-12 he built a wooden boat. Back then, boats were powered by bicycle like pedals that would turns paddles in the back. So he went to a local auto yard and bought a bicycle for the pedals and made his first boat. He would take his boat out and fix all the problems he discovered. On his first trip he realized it leaked so he infused wax with gasoline and poured it in the cracks. This lead to his life as a pioneer in boat building.

2. What made you want to make your own boat company?

His love for boats made him decide to make his own boat company after WWII. He contacted a rich friend and used his money to buy and restore a 42 ft. Schooner; this is what really got him interested in mechanics.

3. What was it like to see your boat company become a success?

“A Miracle.” He started with no money so he got three partners to help him with the financial part; Tritt handled the mechanics and sales. Glasspar became the largest manufacture of fiberglass boats. But he and his partners didn’t see eye to eye, which led to him being pushed out.

4. When was the first G-3 introduced?

In 1956 he and management met in Phoenix, Arizona. Tritt had been sketching it for a while and finally convinced management to develop it. The 5 plant managers didn’t like the idea but it became a success and is now a classic fiberglass boat.

5. What did you do before you founded Glasspar?

Built Sail boats

6. What was a normal day of work for you?

In 1949 he started Glasspar in a garage where he would work from 7 AM till late at night. This may sound like a long day, but Tritt loved it.

7. What was it like working with Disney?

It was fun, although he wasn’t the one to design the autopia cars, Glasspar was the one to produce them. Glasspar also made the 30 foot “jungle ride” boat. He liked Walt Disney because he was very creative and changed things up.

8. During the sixties when other companies started designing car-like models, what made you stay with the classic boat model?

He loves boats and cars but felt that they weren’t the same thing and wanted that to stay the same.

Side notes
• The Seafair sedan was his favorite design and still gets calls from manufacturers wanting to use it for their design.
• He was pushed out of management by his partners after they argued about their car designs and the fact that Tritt wanted to start using inboard motors instead of outboard.

George

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1 year 8 months ago #28932 by gwbell
gwbell replied the topic: From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing
As part of the report, Alex also interviewed Eddie. Here's his notes on that interview:

Mr. Eddie Grijalva Interview

1. When did you start your time with Glasspar?
1952 to 1962. He worked at the original Glasspar factory in Santa Ana

2. What was your job with Glasspar?
He worked from bottom up. Started in sanding and grinding, moved to assembly line, to gel coating and spraying, moving, wood, and ended in Research and Development.

3. What drew you into working for Glasspar?
When he was young he was working for the Mississippi Glass Co. in Fullerton. One day his brother and friends were telling him about this new boat company that worked with this stuff called “fiberglass”. He didn’t know what that was so he went on a Monday to check it out and decided to begin work there. The income was better and he was more interested in that area than glass.

4. What was a normal work day like at Glasspar?
The whistle to be at your station blew at 7 AM. He would work at his department until a ten minute break that started at 10 AM. During that break he would get a sandwich and some coffee supplied by a truck. He would then return to work until the lunch hour at 12:30. The work day ended at 3:30.

5. Did you enjoy your time working for Glasspar?
Mr. Grijalva enjoyed his time at Glasspar because of the after work events. He played on the company sponsored Flag football team, baseball team, and bowling team. During Christmas the company hosted a big Christmas party for the employee’s children. The kids would receive nice toys and the employees were given hams or turkeys.

6. Was the workplace safe?
Back then, working at Glasspar was considered safe, but compared to today’s standards, Glasspar, like all companies back then, fell short. Glasspar employees worked with dangerous machinery and chemicals. One such chemical was acetone, back then people didn’t know of acetones danger. Back in those days there weren’t as many safety and environmental laws.

George

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1 year 8 months ago #28933 by 16again
16again replied the topic: From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing
Thanks George for going to the effort. Would still be interested in reading the complete report at some point. I'm sure others would as well.
Jack

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1 year 8 months ago #28934 by Jayarrgh
Jayarrgh replied the topic: From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing
That's a great set of interviews, thanks for sharing. I learned something too... that my first Glasspar boat ride was not in a Seafair Sunliner in 1961 as I believed. It was actually in a Disneyland Jungle Ride boat in 1955! :woohoo:

George FYI,
There are several free format converters (Word to PDF) available on the internet. Personally, I use PDFlite (free download) which will convert many text formats to PDF. Once installed, you open your word doc and print it to PDFlite instead of a real printer to convert it. It works well for me.

-JR (Jerry) :)

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1 year 8 months ago #28959 by Terrydi
Terrydi replied the topic: From the BOAT GRAVE YARD TO THIS, amazing
Hello George,

Thanks for sharing those very interesting interviews.

Although I don’t understand the applications issues you mention.

Word documents can be simply copied and pasted into the post.

And Word documents can be saved as a PDF simply by changing the file type to PDF when saving in Word.

Now to convert a PDF to Word requires an Adobe upgrade or the “free converters” as -JR mentions.

But I never been able to figure out how to post a PDF on this site.

What am I missing here?

Terry

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